THOMAS LINCOLN - ~~ CASEY LIBRARY 1925

»

B IOLOGIA CENTRALI-AMERICANA.

INSECTA,

CL

COLEOPTERA. Vou. III. Parr 2. \

MALACODERMATA

BY THE Rev. HENRY STEPHEN GORHAM, F.ZS., &c.

1880-1886.

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INTRODUCTION.

Tue Malacodermata are an assemblage of Coleoptera forming the second half of Latreille’s group “Serricornes,” and include (as adopted in this volume), in addition to the “‘Malacodermes” of M. Lacordaire’s ‘‘Genera des Coléoptéres,” the families Cleride, Lymexylonide, Ptinide, Bostrychide, and Cioide. Although, perhaps, some exception may be taken to the term Malacodermata as being inapplicable to these latter families, which have in general the integuments as hard as they are in most Coleoptera, there yet can, I think, be no doubt as to the propriety of uniting them all as one aggregate in a work which, like the present one, treats of a whole fauna. The most obvious character, which all possess in common with the other Serricorn Coleo- ptera, is the frequency with which the antenne have their joints developed on their inner sides in such a manner that their articulations become serrate or pectinate. This general character is, it is true, subject to much variation, but the variations are of degree; the antenne are sometimes flabellate on one or on both sides, or they are simply pectinate, or give rise to long filiform processes, or they are clavate, the three terminal joints being longer or altogether much larger than the rest, or rarely (as in Ptinus) they are simple; but the fact remains that in each of the families we find genera reproducing the typical form.- The authors of Monographs of the separate families, in dealing with their classification, appear often to have given undue import- ance to characters which do not hold good for more than two or three of the families, important though they are without doubt in characterizing these lesser associations. It has not been found necessary or useful here to adopt generalizations such as the

Appendicitarses” of Spinola, or the Mollipennes,” Floricoles,” and Gibbicolles

of Mulsant.

‘Two families, it will be noticed, are absent from our fauna, viz. the Drilide and the Cupeside, both of small extent; but of these, the latter, consisting of one abnormal a2

iv INTRODUCTION.

genus, is represented in America north of Mexico by three species, and it would be

_ premature to assume that both families may not be present.

Perhaps no tribe of beetles has been more neglected than this one, and therefore deductions founded on mere numbers of species as given in our catalogues cannot be considered of great value. A reference to the proportion of species enumerated in this volume to those given in Gemminger and Harold’s Catalogue will make this obvious.

Of all the families here united under the Malacodermata the known species amount to but 3530, while from Central America alone we here record 813 species, contained in 120 genera, of which no less than 535 species and 28 genera are now described, as it is believed, for the first time. |

The only regions of which our knowledge of these insects was more complete than of Central America previous to the publication of this work were the United States portion of the Nearctic, and the Palearctic region, exclusive of Asia generally. It is now seen that the Tropical portions of the earth are as rich, or richer, in these groups than the cooler parts, not only from the collections which have come to the Editors, but from other evidence before me from other districts. Hence, if we simply calculate by the percentage of new species to those already described, and if we exclude from our calculation the European species (which numbered 1151 in Marseul’s Catalogue of 1866), and those of North America (508 in Crotch’s Check List of 1874), as having been better investigated, we shall find, in a rough way, that if the species of this tribe from the rest of the world were only collected and described to the same extent as is here done for Central America, the whole number could not amount to less than 9500. And considering the numbers that have been, and are still being yearly, added to the European and North-American lists, I think we shall be much within the mark in assuming that there exist not less than 12,000 species of this section of the Coleoptera.

With respect to the distribution of the 120 genera to which the Central-American species are referred, any generalization drawn from the whole number would be very much invalidated by the consideration that the work of differentiation has at present only been fairly begun in the Lycide, the Telephoride, the Melyride, the Ptinide, and the Bostrychide (it is more advanced in the Lampyride and Cleride), and it is chiefly in these families that it has been found necessary to propose new genera. Of these I observe that, with three or four exceptions, the few species which can be associated with them from other parts are about in equal numbers from North and South America. But in the families in which I have not found it necessary to

INTRODUCTION. Vv

make many fresh genera, viz. in the Lampyride and Cleride, of the former five genera out of sixteen occur in the Nearctic region also, but twelve at least occur and are well represented by species in South America; of the latter there are 25 genera (omitting Necrobia which is universal); of these, four occur in the Nearctic, seven in the Nearctic and Tropical South American regions, and five are common to Central and South America.

These facts show the preponderance of relationship between our fauna and that of Tropical South America over any community it possesses with that of America north of Mexico.

But this conclusion is rendered even more apparent if we consider the relative | numbers of species in some of the larger genera. Calopteron is a genus of the Lycide eminently typical of Tropical South America, where 70 species at least are known to exist. Now, north of Mexico, only three species are known, but in Central America we have 42 species. To give another instance, from the Telephoride, Chauliognathus is represented in America north of Mexico by 8 species, in Central America by 45, in South America by 28 species; the latter figure by no means representing the actual number, as the species of that country have not been much worked at, while the North- American are nearly certainly known. On the other hand Podaérus, a Nearctic genus, especially abundant in North America, where it has 32 species, is barely represented by a solitary species in Northern Mexico and does not pass further south.

More striking, however, is the marked peculiarity of the Central and South American genera as compared with the faunas of other parts of the globe. If it were true that similar conditions would produce similar forms, how is it that the specialized genera of os the Neotropical region are so dissimilar to those of the Athiopian and Indo-Malayan ? Of the few genera common to our district and to the Palearctic or Tropical regions of the Old World, I do not hesitate to affirm that there is not one which is not of the rank of feebly differentiated forms, or persistent forms of an earlier stage of development. The apparent exceptions in the Lycide of Lycus and Lycostomus, in the Telephoride of Silis, in the Ptinidee of Ptinus, and in the Cioide of Xylographus, being due to the imperfectly characterized condition of those genera; while the total absence of such widely distributed and well-marked forms as Erosand Calochromus, Luciola, Telephorus (proper), Malachius, Dasytes (proper), Henicopus, Melyris, Cylidrus, Opilo, and Trichodes . cannot be explained by any intrinsic dissimilarity in the conditions, which certainly do not differ more than they do in the wide areas over which these genera are dispersed,

vl INTRODUCTION.

but rather by the isolation from these other areas, contact with which is only effected through the northern portion of the globe.

One further fact is worthy of notice, viz. that, to whatever cause it may be due, where a genus is common to Central or South America and other distant parts of the World, it is also the case that it is represented by a species also identical or nearly so in both districts. In this case its presence must either be due to transmission recently, through artificial means, or to the conditions having long remained practically similar under which it exists in places so far apart. The genera Plateros, Lycostomus, Meli-. tomma, Atractocerus, Necrobia, Apate, Dinoderus, and Cis, all afford examples of this. remarkable truth. Cylidrus, indeed, occurs in Brazil, but only in a species known to inhabit Madagascar and the eastern coast of Africa with very slight modification. Atractocerus, of which the distribution is remarkable, is represented by a species hardly differing from an African one. Dinoderus is a North American. genus but with one cosmopolitan species. C%s has one species with difficulty to be distinguished from the common C. boleti of Europe. | .

A few words as to the materials which have been at my disposal may be useful. It is probable that (thanks to the liberality of the Editors, who have spared no trouble or expense to obtain for the purpose of the work all the large collections that were available) such a mass of specimens in this group were never brought together before. These were very largely increased by their own collectors, especially by Mr. Champion, who paid a very great deal of attention to this group, more especially to the Lycide, Lampyride, and Cleridee—all numerous in species and individuals in the humid forest- regions of Central America—and sent home large and beautiful series often amounting to 100 specimens of a species. Roughly speaking I do not think that less than 10,000 specimens have passed through my hands, and been separately examined during the progress of the volume. |

The northern portion of Mexico (including the large State of Yucatan), and Costa Rica, still remain, comparatively speaking, unexplored.

H.S. G.

May 1886.

He,

ERRATA ET CORRIGENDA.

Page Line 14 2 for Exvos read Eros 15 28 for II. read I. 26 3 after puniceus insert’ (Tab. IV. fig. 1, 3.)

27 34 for Calodadon read Calocladon 28, 29 several places for Calodadon read Calocladon 29 12 for pectinicornis read pectinicorne. (Tab. IV. fig. 2.)

96 1 for 4 read 3 124 27 erase (Tab. VII. fig. 10.) 129 1 for 1 read 2 3

129 36 after (?) insert (Tab. IX. fig. 1.)

129 39 after “The” insert male: and after Chacoj,” the female (?) - from Pantaleon

178 18 for histrica read histrio

180 5 for C. read J.

187 6 for Pelonia read Pelonium 208 9 before about” insert is

215 13 for muricata read muricatum

217 16 for pusillus read pusilla

217 21 The word GuaremaLa”’ is wrongly placed; it should precede “San Gerénimo” in line 22,

222 5 insert Cis before bilimeki

LIST OF

PLATES.

BIOL. CENTR.-AMER., Coleopt., Vol. III. Pt. 2, May 1886. - 6b

Plate. | Fig. Page. Plate. | Fig. Page Lycus schonherri, ¢ .......... I, 3 2 | Calopteron tricostatum, 2 .... Il. 6 17 carmelitus, ¢ .......... I. 1 2 notatulum .............. XI. 5) 235 godmani, d ........655- I. 2 3 decipiens .............. XI. 7 235 fuliginosus, ¢*.......... I. 5 4 imitator...0.... 0.00000 XI. 6 236 Lycostomus lineicollis .... ... I. 4 4 || Ceenia cardinalis, Q .......... I. 24 17 sordidus, Q .......--6.- I. 6 5, 225 scapularis, Q .......... I. 23 18 championi, Q .......... oO. 7 5 interrupta ............4- I. 22 18 bucolicus, G ........006- XI. 1 226 || Plateros seminiger, Q ........ . I. 15 19 loripes, Ow... cece eee .. I. 8 6, 226 bourgeoisi, Q ........6- I. 20 | 19, 238 sommeri,,Q ......+2.08- IT.: 2 6, 226 bourgeoisi, ¢ ......6- {IL 10 | 19, 228 semiustus, 2 ............ I. 9 6 letourneuri§ ............ Il. 7 20 Lygistopterus amabilis ........ JOL 10 7 apicalis, Q 1.6... eee XI. 9 | 20, 288 hematopterus .......... II. 1 8 lateritius, Q ............ IT. 16 | 21, 239 leetus, Sw. cece ee ee eee XI. 2 227 bogotensis ...........5. II. 18 21 Lucaina marginata............ XII. 8 229 forreranus ...........25. XI. 8 239 Calopteron bifasciatum ........ I, 11 8, 229 parallelus .............. IT. 19 22 bifasciatum, var......... I. 12 8, 229 || Calleros puniceus, ¢ .......... IV. 1 26 corrugatum ............ II. 3 9 || Calolycus calanticatus ........ IV. 3 27 pallidum, 9 ............ I. 14 9, 229 || Calocladon testaceum, g ...... Il. 20 | 28, 244 affine, Q ww... eee eee I. 13 10 rubidum, ¢ ........-4.. XI. 13 246 —— melanopterum .......... I. 15 10 rubidum, 2 .........+.- XI. 14 246 reticulatum ............ I. 17 10 pectinicorne ............ IV. 2| 29, 246 flavipes, Q. .......04... I. 18 | 11,230 ephippium, ¢ .......... XI. 10 247 divergens, d........008. II. 4 11 ephippium, Q .......... XI. 11 247 scapulare, Q.........06- OL 25 12 || Linoptes imbrex, ¢ .......... XI. 12 247 scapulare, d.........0-- II. 5 12 || Lycinella opaca .............. XI. | 15 249 juvenile.............00. I. 16 | 12, 230 parvula ..........00 008 XI. | 16 249 triste, Q oe... eee ee eee OL, 21 | 18, 231 || Lamprocera picta, g .......... III. 1] 30,249 rufulum, df.......-.4.. II. 8 | 18,231 picta, var, d ......00e. XI. 17 249 rufulum, Q ............ II. 9 13, 231 || Hyas rhomboidea, g .......... TII. 2 30 pennatum, Q .......... II. 11 13 || Cladodes plumosa ............ III. | 21 31 pennatum, G ........-. IL. 12 13 || Pheenolis laciniatus, gd ........ II. 22 31 obliquum ..... .....--. II. 13 | 14, 232 || Athra despecta .............. IIT. 3 | 382, 251 rubrotestaceum, Q ...... XI. 3 233 brunnipennis............ XI. 19 251 lineare ........0- eee eee IT. 14 |} 14,233 || Drilolampadius stolatus........ III. 20 | 33, 251 —— lineare, var.t .......... IV. 5 233 scutellaris, var., d ...... XI. 20 33, 252 ichnoides, G .....-+eeee- II. 21 | 15, 234 || Megalophthalmus collaris ...... XI. 24 253 ——— mimicum .............. . IL. 22 | 15, 234 || Lucidota bella .............. III. 4 35 simulator, dG... ee eee eee XI. 4 234 apicalis, ¢ .........2.. Il. 3) 36 beltii, Q .. eee eee eee ee I. 19 15 diaphanura ............ IV. 22 36 matutinum .......+..6-. II. 7 16 discolor, Q ..........-. III. 6 37 rubricolle, 9 ........606- IV. “4 234 discolor, var............. XI. 23. 258 * Lycostomus fuliginosus on the Plate. + Calopteron tenue on the Plate. | + The sexes are erroneously marked on the Plate; see text. § Plateros latourneurt on the Plate.

Lucidota lugens, ¢ incompta, ¢ xanthopleura. .

Photinus congruus, ¢

meteoralis —— gliscens nigridorsis, 2 ovatus, ¢ perelegans, 3 extensus, 2

productus, ¢ consanguineus, cinctellus, 9 cinctellus, ¢ —— (?) brevicornis sturmli, 2 ——— salvini, 2 montanus guatemale lunicollis

sanguinicollis aurora armatus, 3 perlucens purulanus

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Pyrectomena angulata, ¢

vexillaria, 3 striatella, ¢

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Pr ee

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Cratomorphus picipennis, 2 ....

altivolans concolor

ovatus, 3 fasciatus, ¢ Aspidosoma egrotum depictum

—— pulchellum bilineatum, 2 bilineatum, ¢ costatum —— elianum —— physonotum, ¢ (?) (larva)

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Photuris discicollis, 2

collaris, 2 lucidicollis....

mollis, ¢ crassa, ¢ crassa, var., 2

lucidicollis, var.

sordida

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LIST OF PLATES. .

Plate. | Fig Page. Plate. | Fig Page. IV. 18 37 || Phengodes bimaculata ........ III. | 28] 63, 276 XI. 22 253 bipennifera, var. ........ V. 1 65 XI. 21 254 || Daiphron lyciforme, Q ........ V. 2 66 IV. 12 88 || - crassicorne, 9 .......... V. 24 67> : V i“ 38, _ proteum, var., 2 ........ V. { i 68, 277 IV. 17 39 proteum, var., d ........ V. 16 | 68,277 IV. 16 40 || Chauliognathus dimidiatus, ¢ .. V. 3. 69 III. 12 | 40, 260 faustUS ...........0 eee XII. | 14 278 IV. 11 41 sodalis, Q..........000. V. 8 69 IV. 10 41 sodalis, var., Q.......... V. 9 69 IV. 25 42 || —— jucundus, 2 ............ V. 5 70 IV. 23 42 tricolor, Q ............ V. 6 70 LY. 24 42 || -—— Janus, var., d ........-. V. 4 yet a o 20 togatus, var., .....4.- V. { | a } 71, 278 IV. 6 44 || —— nigrocinctus ...........-. V. 12 72 XII. | 10 263 || —— bilineatus .............. V. 13 | 72,279 III. 10 | 44, 2638 bilineatus, var., d ...... XII. 16 279 III. 9 | 44, 264 submarginatus, Q ...... VI. 16 279 TIT. 8 45 emaciatus ...........06- V. “17 75 III. 7 | 45, 264 obliquus ............4.. XII. | 15 281 XII. 2 265 hastatus, Q .........05. Vv. 7 TT III. 11 46 || Diseodon normale, 9* ........ V. 20 | 82, 287

“XII. 1 267 -normale, 5 .........0.. VI. 20 | 82,287 IV. 19 50 cleroides, Qf .......05. V. 18 | 84, 287 IV. 20 50 || —— photinoides, Qf ........ Vv. 19 | 84, 288 Il. 13 | 51, 269 serricorne, Q .......... VI. 18 288 IV. 7 52 | —— histrio, ¢ § ............ V. 22 86, 288 XII. 3 270 difficile, Q|| ............ VI. 19 | 86, 288 XII. 5 270 purpurascens, QQ ...... V. 23 87 XI. 18 271 lampyroides, 9**........ VI. 15 | 89, 288 XII. 4 271 || Silis lycoides, 9 .............. V. 21} 91,290 OE o4, e —— serrigeraTT ........5... VI. 1 { 92, ae IV. 15 54 || —— premorsa, d............) VIL 2 93 IV. 8 | 55; 272 || —— eroidestt .............. VI. 6 | 94, 296 IV. 9 | 55,272 chalybeipennis .......... XIt. | 18 300 TI. 18 | 55,272 || —— dilacerata, g............ VI. 3 96 XII 6 272 || ——albicincta, S$$.......... VI. 5 96 XII. 7 272 laticollis, ¢ .....e eee ee VI. 17 97 XII. | 26 271 || Trypherus forficulinus ........ VI. 7 98 IV. 26 57 || Lobetus mirabilis, ¢ .......... VI. 10 99 IIT. 15 58 -mirabilis, 9 ...........4. VI. 11 99 III. 14 | 58,275 | Belotus abdominalis .......... VI. 8 | 99, 308 XII. | 11 275 || Maronius dichrous, g ........ VI. 9 | 100, 309 III. 19 61 dichrous, var. .........- XII. | 17 309 XII. | 12 274 || Thinalmus pectinicornis, ¢ VI. 13 | 101, 309 XII. | 13 274 || Malthinus laticeps ............ VI. 14 103

* Telephorus normalis on the Plate.

+ Telephorus cleroides on the Plate. t Telephorus photinoides on the Plate. § Telephorus histrio on the Plate. || Telephorus photurinus on the Plate.

{ Silis (?) purpurascens on the Plate. ** Telephorus lampyroides on the Plate. +t Stlis varians, var., on the Plate.

tt Euryopa eroides on the Plate.

$$ Euryopa albicincta on the Plate.

LIST OF PLATES. xi Plate Fig. Page. Plate Fig Page. Ptorthodius ramosus, d......-. VI. 12 | 107, 812 || Phonius sanguinipennist ...... VII. | 24 145 Euryopa singularis, ¢ ?.......s} VI. 4 | 109, 312 || Peecilochroa plumbea.......... XIII. | 11 337 Melitomma brasiliense, 2 ...... VII. 3 | 110, 313 || Aulicus monticola ......-..... VIII. | 18 146 Atractocerus brasiliensis ...... VII. 7 | 112,313 || Clerus quadrinodosus.......... VIII. | 19 151 Collops aulicus, d ..........-. VI. 21 113 quadrinodosus, var. ...... VIII of 151 aulicus, 2 ...... eee eee VI. 22 113 || —— x-album .............. VIII. | 22 151 tricolor ... 2... cee ee eee XITI 1 | 113,313 CINETEUS ... 2... eee ee eee Vil 5 152 vittatus, var., Q. ......-- VI. 23 | 114, 316 tubercularis .... ......| VIII. | 20 153 Anthocomus maculosus ......-- VII. 1 115 CONCINNUS. ... 6. eee eee ee VIII. | 12 153 pusillus ..........00065- VI. 24 116 contractus .........---6- VIII. | 13 154 ____ hasalis, var. rufipennis* . VI. | 25 116 beatus .......... ee eee VIII. .| 23 154 Attalus (?) calearatus.......... XIII 3 319 PictuSs ...... eee ee eee Vill 7 155 subfasciatus ............ XIII 2 320 || —— opifex ...........0008- VITL 3 156 carinatus, G .... see eee XIII. 4 320 || —— cylindricus.............. VIII 6 157 Ebeeus eeneovirens .........--- VIL. 2 121 || —— recurvatus .........-... VIII. | 17 158 Lemphus serricornis .......... XIII 5 321 || —— esopius ..........60-0-, VIII 8 160 -| Dromanthus nitidicollis........ XIII 6 322 || —— cuneatus ...........4.. VIII. | 16 160 decipiens .........eeeee VII. 5 122 || —— plagiatus .............. XII. | 21 339 quadrimaculatus ........ VII. 4 122 || —— atriceps................ VIII. | 21 | 161,340 jucundus ...........06- VIL | 6] 123,323 . 9,10, Cymbolus rufopiceus ..-....... xt. | 12 304 || imeonstans§ ....-..+..-. VIEL. yyy 163 Listrus cupreonitens+ ........ VII. 8 125 || Salleea necrobioides............ VIII. | 15 164 Astylus vittatus ......0...665, VII. 9 | 127, 330 || Blaxima rubripennis|| ........ VIII. | 14 165 octopustulatus, g.......- XII. | 25 330 || Epiphloeus setulosus .......... VIII. | 24 166 Antixoon eribripenne.......... XIII. | 13 3832 PYINCePS...... ce eee eee XII. 19 340 Tillus occidentalis, ¢.......... IX. 2 129 || —— erythrocephalus.......... VIII. | 25 167 occidentalis, 9? ........ IX. 1 129 || Hydnocera guatemale ........ IX. 3 168 collaris ..........00000- XIII. 7 332 subulata .........-2000. IX. a 169 Cymatodera sallai ............ VII. | 13 130 nitidicollis.............. IX. 9 171 discoidalis ............-- VII. | 10 131 || —— trichroa..............4. IX. 5 171 discoidalis, var........... VII. | 15 131 furcata ........ 0. eee ee XIII. | 14 342 championi, gd .......... VII. | 12 131 || —— corticina, 9 ............ IX, 6 173 saturata....... 0. eee eee XIII. 8 334 Cincta «1... eee eee ees IX. 8 175 bipunctata.............. VII. | 16 | 135,334 | —— impressa .............. IX. 7 176° ——— marmorata.............. VII. | 14 136. || —— cylindricollis............ XIII. | 16 343 valida... 2c... eee eee eee VIL. | 11 137 VityiNa 6... eee eee eee XIII. | (15 343 Priocera stictica............-. VII. | 17 | 140,335 || Ichnea histrio................ X. 1 178 clavipes ..........ee eee. XIIT. 9 | 140, 335 mexicana, G....--.eeeee IX. 18 179 Colyphus ventralis ............ VIL. | 18 141 mexicana, Q........ sees IX. 19 179 quadrilineatus .......... VII. | 20 141 || —— mexicana, var., d........ IX. 21 179 —— quadrilineatus, var. ...... VII. | 21 141 || —— panamensis ............ X. 2 179 —— mutabilis .............. Vil. | 23 142 || —— religiosa...........-..4. IX. 20 180 —— mutabilis, var. .......... VII. 1 142 || —— disjuncta .............. IX. 23 180 —— bilineatus ...........4.. XIII. | 10 335 disjuncta, var. .......... IX. 24 180 floralis .......... eee ee VIL. | 25 142 enoplioides ..........4- IX. 22 180 distinctus ............5- VIL. | 19 143 vitticollis ...........0.4. XIT. | 24 345 signaticollis ............ VII. | 22 143 || Platynoptera mexicana ........ IX. 11 183 —— relucenS...........e eee XII. | 22 336 || Pyticera championi .......... IX. 10 184 criocerides.........+.065 VIII 2 144 || Orthopleura purpurea ........ IX. 17 186 Colyphus gracilis ...........- XIII. | 19 337 || Chariessa elegans ..........-. XII. | 23 346

* Anthocomus rufipennis on the Plate.

+ Listrus cupronitens on the Plate. t Colyphus sanguinipennis on the Plate.

§ Clerus nitidus, var., on the Plate.

|| Clerus rubripennis on the Plate.

Xil LIST OF PLATES. Plate. | Fig Page. Plate. | Fig Page Pelonium luridum ............ XII. | 20 346 || Thaptor throscoides .......... X. 12 206 amabile .............06- IX. 15 189 | Cathorama seminulum ........ X. 13 | 207, 349 metallescens .......... IX. 16 189 || Mirosternus brunneivillis ...... XIII. | 18 349 bilineicolle.............- IX. 12 190 || Dorcatoma tomentosa.......... X. 16 | 208, 350 octonotatum ............ IX. 13 191 | Priotoma quadrimaculata + X. 17 | 209, 351 lineolatum .............. IX. 14 191 || Polycaon exesus, 2 .......... X. 18 210 Lebasiella pallipes ............ IX. 25 192 CXESUS, SD wee eee ee eee X. 19 210 bisbinotata ............ IX. 26 192 || Bostrychus verrucosus ........ X. 22 | 214, 353 Ptinus latefasciatus .......... X. 5 194 || Xylopertha sericans .......... X. 21 | 215, 353 lateralis...........-04.. X. 6 195 || Dinoderus perfoliatus.......... XIII. | 25 353 Trigonogenius niveus.......... X. 3 197 || Tetrapriocera longicornis ...... X. 20 218 niveus, Val. 1... 2.22000. X. = 197 || Xylographus suillus .......... XIII. | 21 354 arcuatuS .....0...e0eee XIII. | 20 847 latirostris, G............ XIII. | 23 355 Pitnus pygmeus.............. X. 8 198 latirostris, Q............ XIII. | 24 355 Trichodesma imperator ........ X. 9 199 || Macrocis taurus, ¢ .......... X. 25 219 albina ..........eceeeee X. 10 199 || Cis fasciatus, G we... eee eee X. 23 220 albistolata * ............ X. 7 200 bisbidens, d .......-..-- X. 24 921, Anobium sericatum? .......... XIII. | 17 | 201, 347 ~tetracentrum, g ........ XIII. | 22 356 Micranobium pulicarium ...... X. 14 202 || Ceracis militaris, ¢ .......... X. 26 | 223, 358 Lidolius punctatus ............ X. 15 203 tricornis, ¢ we... eee eee X. 27 224 Thaptor pupatus.............. Xx. 11 205

* Trichodesma albistolatus on the Plate.

ft Dorcatoma quadrimaculata on the Plate.

BIOLOGIA CENTRALI-AMERICANA.

ZOOLOGIA.

Class INSECTA. Order COLEOPTERA.

Tribe MALACODERMATA. -

Fam. LYCIDZ. Subfam. LYCINA.

Of the three recognized subfamilies of Lycide this is the only one represented on the American continents, the Calochromine and Homalisine being absent. It is, how- ever, in the Tropical regions of the New World that the species of the family appear to reach their highest development ; and in Central America, accordingly, the number of species seems far from being exhausted at present. ‘The genera, on the other hand, are few, and are not capable of very distinct division.

This being so, it would be unwise to generalize upon the distribution of particular genera. The family, as a whole, is rather uniformly distributed, and takes three prin- cipal forms—Lycus, Calopteron, and Metriorrhynchus. The first the typical form of Africa, the second of America, the last of the east (represented by Hros in the northern temperate zone).

The association of species from the other regions with these typical genera must be considered a temporary expedient. We are not able, however, in the present state of our knowledge, to separate them.

LYCUS. Lycus, Fabricius, Mant. Ins. i. p. 163 (1787).

Reserving this genus for those species which have the head rostrate, and which also show any considerable inflation of the elytra, there are seven species known in Central

America.

BIOL. CENT.-AMER., Coleopt., Vol. III., Pt. 2, December 1880. B

2 MALACODERMATA.

1. Lycus schonherri. (Tab. I. fig. 3, ¢ .) Lycus schénherri, Chevr. Col. Mex. Cent. ii. fase. vi. 147.

Hab. Mexico (Hoge), Puebla (Sallé).

Varies in size from 10 millim. to 18 millim.(¢). The body beneath is sometimes yellow ; but the legs are constantly black, except the trochanters. The figure is taken from a small male captured by Hége. In M. Sallé’s collection there were specimens as fully developed as the following species.

2. Lycus carmelitus. (Tab. I. fig. 1, ¢.)

Niger, femorum basi abdominisque apice flavis ; elytris prothoraceque ochraceis, hoc vitta mediana, illis apice oblique nigris.

Mas elytris infra humeros rotundato-ampliatis. Long. 18 millim., lat. 15 millim.

Femina oblonga, elytris infra humeros paululum dilatatis. Long 15 millim., lat. 6 millim.

Hab. Mexico (Hoge, 3 ), Guanajuato (Sallé, 3 ¢ ).

This species differs from L. schénherri in having the femora with the basal half yellow, and the black of the apex of the elytra not so wide, especially at the suture ; its inner margin is thus more oblique. In the male the seventh or penultimate segment is acutely lobed at the sides; the centre is bisinuate, angularly emarginate in the middle. The rostrum is as long as the thorax, with the antenne and rest of the head entirely black. The second joint of the antennz is so short as not to be easily seen, the third as long as the fourth and fifth united, compressed ; the remaining joints with their inner apical angles acute, the inner edge sinuate. ‘The prothorax is about, or nearly, as long as wide, prominent, and elevated into a small carina in front; a shallow, but widened, channel in the middle; the hinder angles are acute, but not much produced in either sex. The elytra show the usual four nervures distinct, the humeral or outer one most so; between them are indistinct indications of transverse reticulation and longitudinal cost, with intricate confluent punctures ; in repose the elytra overlap at the apex.

The figure is taken from Hége’s male specimen.

3. Lycus fernandezi. Lycus fernandezi, Dugés, La Naturaleza, iv. p. 175, t. 6. fig. 5 ¢, fig. 6 9.

Hab. Mexico, Guanajuato (Sallé, 3 @ ).

This species is undoubtedly very closely allied to the one preceding, and may possibly be only a local variation of it. The most constant differences are :—that the abdomen is wholly yellow; the femora are yellow, except at their apexes ; the prothorax is often entirely yellow, but in some specimens has a black vitta on the dorsal channel; the black of the apex of the elytra is more extended in the disk, and is emarginate where the humeral nervure cuts it; the subapical segment in the male is less acutely emarginate.

LYCUS. 3

4. Lycus godmani. (Tab. I. fig. 2, ¢.)

Niger, thorace ochraceo; elytris rubricatis, basi ochraceis, his sutura usque ad medium, illo vitta mediana nigricantibus.

Mas elytris infra humeros rotundato-ampliatis ; prothorace lateribus subparallelis, angulis posticis fere rectis, paulo productis. Long. 15 millim., lat. 10 millim.

Femina elytris magis ovalibus, minus ampliatis; prothorace basi latiore, anigulia posticis acutis, lateribus explanato-elevatis. Long. 14-18 millim., lat. 7-10 millim.

Hab. Mexico, Misantla (Hoge, 3 2 ), Cordova (Sallé, 2 ).

This distinct and beautiful species forms a transition to the Lycostomi, while retaining in a considerable degree the inflated form of typical Lyct. The abdominal segments are of the normal structure; the seventh segment in the male is acutely cut out in the middle. In some specimens the abdomen has the sides yellow, but is usually black, with the head and limbs of the same colour. ‘The elytra are brick-red, shading into ochreous at the base; the third nervure is but little raised, the sculpture between very intricate ; while intermediate longitudinal nervures can be traced, there are no trans- verse cells, but confluent and rugose punctuation. The females have the sides of the prothorax more expanded and reflexed than the male (possibly owing to their being larger specimens) ; it is carinate in front, obsoletely channelled in the centre of the disk. A central vitta, the scutellum, and suture as far as the middle of the elytra are black.

The figure is from the Misantla specimen.

5. Lycus scutellatus.

Niger, prothorace elytrisque rubris, his circa scutellum et ad apicem late, illo vitta mediana nigris. Mas elytris apicem versus dilatatis, segmento ventrali septimo apice haud exciso. Long. 15 millim. Femina elytris minus dilatatis.

Hab. Mexico, Cordova (Sallé, 3 @ ).

This appears to be a variable species. Of the three examples in M. Sallé’s collection the two males have almost half of the elytra black, while one wants the black scutellar patch; and this example is of paler yellow, and has the base of the femora, the rostrum, and sides of the abdomen yellow. The female has only the apical third and the scutellar region black. The legs are black; but the anterior two pairs at the extreme base and the sides of the abdomen are yellow.

The elytra are strongly costate, with subrugose interstices, the third nervure less raised than the others. The black apex of the elytra sufficiently distinguishes it from L. godmani,

to which it is clearly allied.

6. Lycus sallzi. Niger, femorum basi et abdominis lateribus flavis, prothorace elytrisque ochraceis, his basi ac tertia parte apicali, illo vitta mediana nigris; elytris postice paulo ampliatis, interstitiis lineis transversis nonnullis reticulatis. Long. 18 millim., lat. 10 millim. 9°. Hab. Mexico, Puebla (Sallé, ¢ ). B 2

4 MALACODERMATA.

Thorax transversely quadrate, the front angularly prominent and carinate, the disk obscurely channelled, the lateral margins irregularly rounded, parallel near the base ; hind angles right. Scutellum black, margined with fuscous at the apex, foveolate. Elytra with about one fifth at the base and one third at the apex black; punctuation very obsolete ; distinct transverse and indistinct intercostal lines.

A single female is in M. Sallé’s collection.

7. Lycus fuliginosus. (Lycostomus fuliginosus, Tab. I. fig. 5, 3.)

Nigro-fuscus, opacus, thorace elytrorumque basi (sutura excepta) sordide testaceis, illo vitta mediana fusca.

Mas elytris infra humeros medice ampliatis ovalibus, segmento septimo ventrali exciso. Long. 14-16 millim., lat. 10 millim.

Femina latet.

Hab. GuateMALA, Calderas (Champion).

In form and size allied to L. godmani, but differing in its obscure coloration, and in the elytra being a trifle less expanded. The tibie are nearly straight, the anterior pair very slightly curved. This character will prevent its being confounded with L. sordidus, in which they are strongly curved at the base in the male.

LYCOSTOMUS. Lycostomus, Motschulsky, Bull. Mose. 1861, i. p. 186.

This genus is simply an artificial division of Zycus, founded on an Asiatic form, and only differing in the less expansion of the elytra in the males. The American species, which agree in this respect, present nothing by which we can separate them from typical Lycostomi. Indeed one species (L. lineicollis, Chevr.) is so like the Indian Lycostomus thoracicus, Waterh., that it might readily be confounded with it. Nine species from Central America seem properly associable with this type.

1. Lycostomus lineicollis. (Tab. I. fig. 4.) Lycus lineicollis, Chevr. Col. Mex. Cent. ii. fase. vii. 149.

Hab. Mexico, Perote, Coatepec, Esperanza (Hége), Cordova (Sailé).

In the male the tibie are very little bent, and when closed upon the femora no space

is left between them; the seventh segment is excised, and, with the preceding ventral plates, is acutely lobed at the sides.

The figure represents a specimen from Coatepec.

2. Lycostomus tabidus. Niger, abdominis apice, prothoracis lateribus, elytrisque pallide flavis. Long. 15-18 millim. 9°.

Hab. Mexico, Peras, Oaxaca (Sallé, 2 ).

A species nearly allied to L. lineicollis, and of which I have as yet seen only four females.

LYCOSTOMUS. 5

These, however, differ in the following particulars from females of that species :—In large specimens the thorax (though variable) is wider; the black portion of the disk is wider at the base; the colour of the thorax and elytra is quite different, being a dirty horn-colour. The apex of the abdomen is pale.

3. Lycostomus sordidus. (Tab. I. fig. 6, 2.) Nigro-piceus, subnitidus, prothoracis lateribus elytrorumque margine humerali testaceis. Mas elytris vix ampliatis, segmento septimo ventrali haud exciso, tibiis omnibus basi fortiter curvatis. Long. 14 millim., lat. 7 millim. Femina elytris angustioribus, tibiis leviter curvatis. flab. Guatemata, Calderas (Champion, 3 2); Nicaracua, Chontales (Janson, 2 ); Costa Rica, Volcan de Irazu (Rogers, 2, var.).

A Calderas specimen is figured.

4. Lycostomus championi. (Tab. I. fig. 7, 2.)

Nigro-piceus, nitidus, prothoracis limbo elytrisque vitta humerali lata, ante apicem desinente, testaceis.

Mas elytris dilutioribus, infra humeros modice ampliatis ; femoribus (apicibus exceptis) et abdominis margine rufo-testaceis, tibiis basi fortiter curvatis. Long. 10 millim., lat. 6 millim.

Femina elytris minus ampliatis, femoribus nigris vel basi extrema testaceis, abdomine margine apicali piceo. Long. 11-12 millim., lat. 5-6 millim.

Hab. GuaTEMALA, Duefias, Capetillo (Champion).

A long series of specimens of this species were sent by Mr. Champion. It varies some- what in the extent of the yellow marginal stripe; in some few cases the entire base of the elytra is yellow. It is allied to ZL. sordidus; but the difference of colour in the The seventh abdominal segment of the male is not acutely excised, but simply with a very shallow wide emargi- nation, and has, as well as the sixth, a lancet-shaped lobe at the hind angles.

femora of the sexes will prevent their being confounded.

peci gured is from Duefas.

5. Lycostomus deustus.

Nigro-fumosus, prothorace elytrisque ad basin late sed indeterminate sordide testaceis, his subparallelis, infra humeros paulo ampliatis, illo disco plus minusve infuscato, subquadrato, lateribus sinuatis. ¢ 9. Long. 9-11 millim.

Mas tibiis intermediis et posticis fortiter curvatis.

Hab. Panama, Matachin (Thieme).

A beautiful series of specimens of this distinct species was obtained by Dr. O. Thieme, and obligingly placed at my disposal by M. R. Oberthiir. In form it resembles species of the Z. loripes group. The males are not usually more widened behind than the females, The rostrum is of moderate length. The thorax has the sides converging only slightly till they meet the sinuate front. The yellow basal portion of the elytra shades off gradually into the smoky-black opaque apical part, which is more than half of their whole length. |

6 MALACODERMATA.

6. Lycostomus loripes. (Tab. I. fig. 8, 3.) Lycus loripes, Chevr. Col. Mex. Cent. ii. fase. vil. p. 148°. Lycus testaceus, Dej. Cat. . Hab. Mexico’, Guanajuato, Oaxaca, Teapa (Sallé), Almolonga (Hége) ; GuaTEMALA

(Sallé).

I have examined a ‘considerable series of specimens in M. Sallé’s collection, by whom this species was originally discovered, and can only come to the conclusion that it varies in size and colour, but that they are not specifically distinct. In the Guanajuato speci- mens the thorax has the front bisinuate, with prominent anterior angles, and the whole insect is rather more shining and ferruginous red. In HOge’s specimens, one of which is figured, the scutellum is yellow; and I have seen one specimen with the tibie yellow.

7. Lycostomus sommeri. (Tab. II. fig. 2.)

Pallide testaceus, antennis (basi excepta), tibiis, tarsis elytrorumque apice nigris ; thorace antice elevato vix carinato, postice canaliculato, angulis posticis acutis. 9. Long. 11 millim.

Hab. Mexico, Teapa (Sallé) ; Nicaragua, Chontales (Belt).

Allied to Z. loripes, but distinct by the black apical third of the elytra &c. The Teapa specimen is figured. :

8. Lycostomus semiustus. (Tab. I. fig. 9, 9.)

Lycostomus semiustus, Chevr. Col. Mex. Cent. i. fase. v. 105.

Hab. Mexico, Cordova (Sallé, 3 2), Jalapa (Hoge, ¢ ).

The tibie of the male, especially the hind pair, are much bent, and the posterior femora thickened ; the trochanters subdentate.

A variety taken by Hoge at Jalapa, whence the specimen figured was obtained, is paler in colour than the type, and has the underside of the body partly yellow; but, from the shrivelling of the elytra, this I think is due to immaturity.

9. Lycostomus carnifex.

Niger, prothoracis lateribus elytrisque sanguineo-rufis, his circa scutellum nigris, lineis octo leviter elevatis ; prothorace transverso, antice carinato, medio canaliculato, angulis posticis acutis productis. Rostro in utroque sexu perbrevi. ¢ 2. Long. 11 millim.:

Mas elytris leviter ampliatis, segmento septimo inciso.

Hab. Mexico, Jacale (Sal/é).

This insect may profitably be compared with Lygistopterus sanguineus (L.), which it resembles in size and colour, as illustrating the differences between the genera. ‘The rostrum is as short as in that species; the second joint of the antenne, however, is much shorter. The thorax has the usual carina in front. In L. sanguineus the channel

LYGISTOPTERUS. a is continued to the front, the hind angles are acute and turned outwards, and the disk lacks the oblique ridge from the hind angle so characteristic of Lygistopterus. Both of these species also closely resemble Plateros lateritiws, which of course is known by its having no rostrum.

LYGISTOPTERUS. Lygistopterus, Mulsant, Ann. Soc. Agr. Lyon, 1888, p. 39.

A genus not hitherto recorded from the northern continent, if we except one species from the United States, which probably belongs to it (Z. perfaceta, Say), and having for its type the European Dictyoptera sanguinea. It is, however, well represented in South America by fine species of elongate parallel form, with the elytra blue or blackish at the apex, with the base more or less red. ;

It may perhaps be best known by the deep irregular sculpture of its thorax, which consists of a central channel, continued to thé apex, of which the sides are often raised, and from the front of which an oblique carina proceeds to near the hind angles. The central channel is often angularly widened in the middle. The rostrum is variable in length, often very short. The antenne have the second joint short, but not so short as in the preceding genera. The elytra usually have three or four raised lines, the surface covered with very close intricate puncturing, partly concealed by fine close pubescence.

Four species have at present been seen by me from Central America.

1. Lygistopterus nobilis. Niger, nitidus, prothoracis margine laterali elytrisque flavis, his dimidio apicali nigro-ceruleis, sutura juxta scutellum nigra. Long. 15 millim.

Hab. Nicaracva, Chontales (Janson).

While superficially very much resembling L. eximius, Bourg., this species cannot be confounded with it if the following characters are observed :—the thorax has the width of the elytra at the base, is narrowed towards the front, the sides are much more widely yellow; and the elytra have a black patch round the scutellum, extending a little way down the suture. The rostrum is also of an average length, instead of being very short.

2. Lygistopterus amabilis. (Tab. I. fig. 10.)

Niger, nitidus, prothorace et elytris flavo-testaceis, his post medium nigro-cyaneis, illo vitta mediana nigra, angulis posticis late rotundatis. Long. 15-16 millim.

Hab. Nicaraeua, Chontales (Le/t). Thorax disciform, the central channel rather linear and narrow, and, in one specimen,

not distinct in front. Both the specimens are females; they have the apical segment with an acute incision, which is continued as a deep fovea to its base.

8 MALACODERMATA.

3. Lygistopterus sulcicollis. Niger, rostro tibiis anticis longitudine equali; elytris sordide flavis, circa scutellum usque ad medium infu- scatis ; thorace ineequali, sulco profundo in medio dilatato, lateribus flavis. 2. Long. 16 millim.

Hab. Mexico, Juquila (Sallé).

This peculiar species is in the colour of the elytra unlike any which are yet described ; yet